Title

Association Between Rurality and Lung Cancer Treatment Characteristics and Timeliness.

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

9-1-2019

Institution/Department

Maine Medical Center Research Institute, Center for Outcomes Research and Evalution

Journal Title

The Journal of rural health : official journal of the American Rural Health Association and the National Rural Health Care Association

MeSH Headings

Carcinoma, Bronchogenic, Lung Neoplasms, Rural Population, Humans

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States, and rural states bear a greater burden of disease.

METHODS: We analyzed tumor registry data to examine relationships between rurality and lung cancer stage at diagnosis and treatment. Cases were from the Maine Cancer Registry from 2012 to 2015, and rurality was defined using rural-urban commuting areas. Multivariable models were used to examine the relationships between rurality and treatment, adjusting for age, sex, poverty, education, insurance status, and cancer stage.

RESULTS: We identified 5,338 adults with incident lung cancer; 3,429 (64.2%) were diagnosed at a late stage (III or IV). Rurality was not associated with stage at diagnosis. For patients with early-stage disease (I or II), rurality was not associated with receipt of treatment. However, for patients with late-stage disease, residents of large rural areas received more surgery (10%) compared with metropolitan (9%) or small/isolated rural areas (6%), P = .01. In multivariable analyses, patients in large rural areas received more chemotherapy (OR 1.48; 95% CI: 1.08-2.02) than those in metropolitan areas. Patients with early-stage disease residing in small/ isolated rural areas had delays in treatment (median time to first treatment = 43 days, interquartile range [IQR] 22-68) compared with large rural (34 days, IQR 17-55) and metropolitan areas (35 days, IQR 17-60), P = .0009.

CONCLUSION: Rurality is associated with differences in receipt of specific lung cancer treatments and in timeliness of treatment.

ISSN

1748-0361

First Page

560

Last Page

565

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